All posts tagged: orange coast magazine

This is why we fact check

“If your mother says she loves you…check it out.” A cardinal rule in journalism. But, the importance of this rule is increasingly lost among local, national and even international media. In the last few years, newsrooms have lost funding and cut jobs–and fact checkers are typically the first to go. If history is any indication, sustaining a reputable, ethically responsible publication requires fact checking at the most basic level. Famous incidents where fact checking was thrown by the wayside (i.e. Stephen Glass and Janet Cooke) have disrupted lives and disgusted readers. I spent the majority of my summer working as a fact checker for Orange Coast Magazine. As I called and emailed sources, scoured the Internet and researched records to check everything from dates to names to the cross streets of a statue, I realized I was helping to maintain the journalistic integrity of Orange Coast Magazine. And that’s important. The Society of Professional Journalists has made it clear that the duty of journalists is to provide information in “an accurate, comprehensive, timely, and understandable manner.” The group states one …

A list of good journalism

Just like sports players have their ‘fantasy league’ teams, writers deserve their own list of industry MVPs. Sure, there are Pulitzer winners each year but some of the best work by the average Joes and Janes of journalism often goes unnoticed. The other day I stumbled upon an article: “Slightly more than 100 pieces of good journalism” by The Atlantic’s Conor Friedersdorf. In the short introduction, I learn that Friedersdorf sends out a bi-weekly email containing great journalism recommendations for readers. (Sign up here). Then, each year, he compiles the pieces he’s highlighted into a “Best of Journalism Awards” list. This list has become my manifesto for good journalism. What I like most about Friedersdorf’s list is that he doesn’t interject his opinion. He provides a publication, article title, author and a short excerpt—leaving further exploration and judgement up to readers. The cool thing: No. 1 on the 2013 list? Center of the Universe, the piece published in Orange Coast Magazine that I recently blogged about. A small reassurance that I, too, have an eye for good journalism. It’s resources like this list of worthy journalism …

How to be an intrepid journalist

My reporting professor calls us intrepid journalists. An intrepid journalist is someone who is brave in their reporting and writing. An intrepid journalist is audacious enough to get that interview, to have that conversation, to write that story. An intrepid journalist is courageous and dauntless. As an aspiring journalist, I’m always admiring journalists who are exceptionally intrepid in their pursuits. I like to think there are even a few different ways to be an intrepid journalist: exposing oneself to danger or discomfort to capture a story that must be told telling a controversial story that must be told sharing personal details to recognize universal truths Each of these types have one common denominator: telling a story. Recently I was scanning Twitter and a tweet by Orange Coast Magazine led me to an incredible story. Click to find out why this story is STILL getting read all over the world: http://t.co/jotgtsMNUL Seduction and a serial killer… — Orange Coast (@OrangeCoastmag) May 12, 2014 The feature piece, Center of the Universe, was published last September and written by Jay Roberts. After reading it, I learned why it’s …

Orange Coast Magazine: ‘In-N-Out’s Burger Queen’

I was doing some company research on Orange Coast Magazine, and stumbled upon this brilliant article on their website, written by Patrick J. Kiger, about the woman behind the burger (really, what isn’t brilliant about In-N-Out?) This detailed and revealing profile of Lynsi Snyder, CEO and current president of In-N-Out, rallies my respect for the 66-year-old burger chain and the young businesswoman who runs it. Stylistic highlights: This lede: “About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill.” The article began as a “day in the life of…” and evolved into a story about the family hardships and successes that continue to lead this dynamic company. That’s the art of storytelling. Kiger’s selection of quotes paints a portrait of Lynsi’s personality: “’I’m a lot like my dad, a little bit of a daredevil,’ she says. ‘I like an adrenaline rush. My dad took me to the racetrack for the first time when I was 2 or 3. … Anything with a motor, that was in my blood.’” …