All posts tagged: journalism

How to be an intrepid journalist

My reporting professor calls us intrepid journalists. An intrepid journalist is someone who is brave in their reporting and writing. An intrepid journalist is audacious enough to get that interview, to have that conversation, to write that story. An intrepid journalist is courageous and dauntless. As an aspiring journalist, I’m always admiring journalists who are exceptionally intrepid in their pursuits. I like to think there are even a few different ways to be an intrepid journalist: exposing oneself to danger or discomfort to capture a story that must be told telling a controversial story that must be told sharing personal details to recognize universal truths Each of these types have one common denominator: telling a story. Recently I was scanning Twitter and a tweet by Orange Coast Magazine led me to an incredible story. Click to find out why this story is STILL getting read all over the world: http://t.co/jotgtsMNUL Seduction and a serial killer… — Orange Coast (@OrangeCoastmag) May 12, 2014 The feature piece, Center of the Universe, was published last September and written by Jay Roberts. After reading it, I learned why it’s …

The Hunter S. Thompson in all of us

Before “Fear and Loathing,” “Hell’s Angels” and pioneering “Gonzo journalism,” Hunter S. Thompson was just a strapping young journalist committed to the craft. (See: Before Gonzo: Hunter S. Thompson’s Early, Underrated Journalism Career) As he is indicted into the 2014 Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame today, let us remember his humble beginnings. Beginnings that may seem familiar to many junior journalists today. Even while his career evolved into a mere caricature of his life—exuberant, exaggerated, eccentric—he began as an eager reporter. (Sadly, his charismatic character still tends to outshine his undeniable journalistic and literary abilities.) Atlantic writer, Brian Kevin, set out to chronicle some of Thompson’s earlier work to prove he was more traditional than many tend to believe. We learn that as an apprentice he traveled the Western Hemisphere churning out travel guides, straight news stories, book reviews and essays—anything he could get his hands on. Thompson positioned himself as a jack of all beats. During his time as a freelancer he experienced, absorbed, learned and practiced. What more could you ask of an aspiring journalist? And so, Kevin yearns …

The balancing act of digital journalism

Like many these days, I get my news online. Twitter and Facebook feeds provide me with bite-sized chunks of information that I can click, read (sometimes skim) and share or send to others. Thus, when an Atlantic article popped up in my Facebook feed today entitled “My Students Don’t Know How to Have a Conversation,” I clicked and read. What I learned made me realize that the future of journalism (and the rest of the world) is in the hands of these students. Some who can’t even hold a conversation… Paul Barnwell, a high school teacher and author of the Atlantic article, said that through projects aiming to practice the skill of conversation he is “focused on sharpening students’ ability to move back and forth between the digital and real world.” Barnwell notices a lack of intellectual discussion, online and in person, among his students and the millennial generation as a whole. Think about this: his class is surely comprised of future lawyers, doctors, engineers, teachers, government officials and most importantly (for the sake of this blog) future journalists. …

Wisdom from a novelist

Jill McCorkle may be the most quotable writer I’ve ever had the pleasure of speaking with. McCorkle, a fiction novelist and creative writing professor at NC State, visited Elon Monday to share some insight with us. Something struck me about McCorkle: the fact that she was able to so eloquently and honestly answer any and all questions my reporting class threw her way. I asked three questions during our 60-minute discussion with her. Here are my questions and her brilliant responses: 1. What are the major differences between a journalistic writing process and a creative non-fiction writing process? One of the biggest, most obvious differences, said McCorkle, is that non-fiction gives you the license to lie and to fill in the blanks. “On a good day, writing non-fiction does feel like a stream of consciousness,” McCorkle said. But, she said, the two have the aspect of self-disipline in common. Some of McCorkle’s most disciplined friends began with a career in journalism. Also, the revision process of creative writing is not unlike journalism, she said. But McCorkle admited …

The Newseum

I always loved writing. But I first knew I wanted to be a journalist when I was 16. It was my second time, but first real memory, of visiting Washington D.C. The leadership program I was with brought us to a number of museums (Smithsonian and the like) over the course of two weeks. The one that I will never forget: The Newseum. I remember approaching the giant rectangular building, blocks away from the iconic Capitol building. The front entrance, lined with glass cases displaying that morning’s front page of news from each of the 50 states. I studied those front pages until I was nearly dragged inside by my groups’ supervisors. Little did I know, those 50 front pages were only the beginning. I can only remember my time spent in The Newseum as awe-inspiring. I got lost in the Pulitzer Prize photojournalism exhibit. And the 9/11 exhibit displaying front page breaking news from around the world. And the story and simulation of the fall of the Berlin Wall. And the delicate archives dating back to the conception of newspapers in the 1800s. …