All posts tagged: analysis

Orange Coast Magazine: ‘In-N-Out’s Burger Queen’

I was doing some company research on Orange Coast Magazine, and stumbled upon this brilliant article on their website, written by Patrick J. Kiger, about the woman behind the burger (really, what isn’t brilliant about In-N-Out?) This detailed and revealing profile of Lynsi Snyder, CEO and current president of In-N-Out, rallies my respect for the 66-year-old burger chain and the young businesswoman who runs it. Stylistic highlights: This lede: “About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill.” The article began as a “day in the life of…” and evolved into a story about the family hardships and successes that continue to lead this dynamic company. That’s the art of storytelling. Kiger’s selection of quotes paints a portrait of Lynsi’s personality: “’I’m a lot like my dad, a little bit of a daredevil,’ she says. ‘I like an adrenaline rush. My dad took me to the racetrack for the first time when I was 2 or 3. … Anything with a motor, that was in my blood.’” …

A chilling profile: Analysis

This recent piece from The New Yorker, written by Andrew Solomon (a writer on politics, culture and psychology) is an incredible example of a profile. For this post, I have analyzed only the first six grafs (presumably the lede and nut graf of this lengthy profile). Solomon profiles the father, Peter Lanza, of the infamous Sandy Hook killer, Adam Lanza. Solomon acts like an old friend of Peter’s, referring to his “new house,” “second wife” and the handful of interviews they did that lasted up to seven hours each. This profile of Peter has impact on readers because the writer: paints a portrait of Peter’s current mental and emotional state uses quotes sparingly and significantly (Ex. “Another time, he said, ‘You can’t get any more evil,’ and added, ‘How much do I beat up on myself about the fact that he’s my son? A lot.’”) provides appropriate background information that contributes to the overall focus of the piece (a look into the life and perspective of Peter) presents Peter as a human being, and a relatable one …

Interview Analysis

This article from The NY Times not only has great quotes but a great lede. The lede… This significant detail lede gracefully introduces conflict and tension. “A brochure for the University of Michigan features a vision of multicultural harmony, with a group of students from different racial backgrounds sitting on a verdant lawn, smiling and conversing.” What about the interview? The article, entitled “Colorblind Notion Aside, Colleges Grapple With Racial Tension” is about the racial tension evident at the University of Michigan. Readers can tell that the interviewer in this article asked questions beyond the basics. A quote like this is evidence that the interviewer was able to capture voice and emotion in his interview: “When I hear people say, ‘We’re all people, we’re all human, I don’t see color,’ to me that means, ‘I don’t see you, you don’t exist,’ ” he said. Mr. Ngo, who is Chinese and gay, said he had been subjected to racist and homophobic epithets. The interviewer was able to speak with a multitude of students, which in some cases, could be hard to …