All posts filed under: In-Depth Stories

Holding onto hope

A rush of emotion washed over Becky’s face as I described the Better Alamance mission: to strengthen community involvement in Alamance County. Including raising awareness about poverty and hunger. “Let me just say…I have a different story than a lot. I live in an apartment and I have two teenage boys, 13 and 15. We aren’t homeless,” says Becky, a client at Allied Churches food pantry. Without hesitation, Becky opens up. “Drinking and driving and drugs got me here, to the bottom of the totem pole,” said Becky, looking around, in reference to the food pantry. A brace squeezes her left ankle and calf together. A scar from a drunk driving accident years ago, she says, unabashedly. “At the time, I was high on the world,” Becky says. “But I’m not 18 anymore.” Despite her hardships, Becky’s attitude remains hopeful. Her demeanor is evident of a hard working, fatigued, mother of two. Her articulateness a rarity among the chaos. Becky says she’s thankful for the food pantry’s generosity. It takes a lot to feed teenage …

National climate change affects local budgets

On Thursday, February 12, 2014 Elon University experienced its first school-wide snow day in as few as three years. Students were excited for a class-free day until many realized the snow, and bitter cold, was inhibiting them from leaving their apartments and dorms. This was only the beginning of a series of snowy days, ice storms and uncharacteristically severe winter weather for the area. The impending issue of climate change is one that the typical American tends to shy away from, its scientific statistics and facts often too complex too decipher. Despite not confronting climate change, it is happening everywhere from the fields of Pennsylvania to the coastal regions of California to Elon’s campus. The weather has been unpredictable this year, leaving workers and residents stung with confusion. Of course, there’s a major factor at play here—weather. There’s also a major player at work that often gets overlooked. Cleanup crews and maintenance workers are left performing damage control after storms, often for weeks or months. In addition, city and college campus boards are responsible for …